Photo by Kepā Maly.

Photo by Kepā Maly.

The thick hand-cut stone wall that forms a side of the pump house was built in 1924 by skilled Japanese stone masons to protect the pumps which transported water from the valley up to Lāna’i City. Glimpses of history share with the haumāna where they come from and how the land came to look the way it does over time.

Mahalo to Pūlama Lāna‘i for providing transportation and staff support, and helping to make this program happen again.

E ‘IKE HOU IĀ LĀNA‘I — TO KNOW LĀNA‘I ONCE AGAIN SUMMER ENRICHMENT CAmp, day 10, june 24, 2016

Photo by Kepā Maly.

Much aloha to many volunteers and the Pūlama Lāna’i Culture & Historic Preservation crew for making the program a great experience for all.


Sharing links below to other days of program and activities.

E ‘Ike Hou Iā Lāna’i – Day 10. Lāna’i Culture & Heritage Center’s Cultural Literacy Summer Program.


Haumāna and kumu returned to Maunalei Valley, where they organized in groups to participate in stewardship, hana ku‘i ‘ai (making poi), and reflecting on the conditions of the land and how to help improve its health.

Kumu led students in the various steps of preparing kalo for pounding; enriching the soil of dry lo‘i with kukui leaves and removing stones, and integrated traditional knowledge of place and practice into their own vocabulary. For example, the belief that one should always say mahalo and express appreciation to the kalo for it’s beautiful growth; and that kalo was also an ancestor of the Hawaiian people, and people who were steadfast in their aloha for the ‘āina were described as “He kalo pa‘a no ka ‘āina” (Taro that was firmly rooted or connected to the land). One of the oldest mele to survive the passing of time also describes Maunalei, with its flowing waters, and growth of ‘ie‘ie.

The group also discussed how the landscape they see today, with the pump house and terraces is not the same one that the ancient Hawaiians knew and lived upon.

Photo by Kepā Maly.

Photo by Kepā Maly.