Uncles Glenn Takeuchi and Albert Morita stoked up the kitchen and group leaders distributed work assignment to cook breakfast and begin breakdown of the camp. Things went quickly, and after the clean up, students walked to Kāhe‘a where they learned about the ancient heiau and ki‘i; and then heard a description of the heiau and ancient practices written in 1856 by Ioane Richardson, who was a Kingdom surveyor.

Waia‘ōpae Fishpond. Photo by Kepā Maly, July 1, 2016.

Photo by Kepā Maly. July 1, 2016.

The students also learned that the heiau had been damaged by development of the Maunalei Sugar Company railroad, and that the Lāna‘i kūpuna believed that was the cause of the plantation’s failure. 

Photo by Kepā Maly. July 1, 2016.

Photo by Kepā Maly. July 1, 2016.

E ‘IKE HOU IĀ LĀNA‘I — TO KNOW LĀNA‘I ONCE AGAIN SUMMER ENRICHMENT CAmp, day 15, july 1, 2016

Photo by Kepā Maly. July 1, 2016.

Photo by Kepā Maly. July 1, 2016.

Mahalo nui to Pūlama Lāna‘i for use of tables, chairs and tents, and for the support of staff from various departments.

E ‘Ike Hou Iā Lāna’i – Day 15. Lāna’i Culture & Heritage Center’s Cultural Literacy Summer Program. Third and final day of E ‘Ìke Hou Iā Lāna‘i Cultural Literacy Camp at Waia‘ōpae Fishpond.

Sharing links below to other days of program and activities.

5:30 a.m. — Found haumāna sleeping in, and a beautiful calm morning and extreme low tide. Sunrise revealed the kuapā of Waia‘ōpae, with nearly the entire 2,000 foot long wall peaking above the ocean’s surface.

After an early lunch, the whole group returned to Lāna‘i City, cleaned up the camping gear, and returned to the LHES classroom to compose their reflections on the camp, work, and history they’d learned.

Photo by Kepā Maly. July 1, 2016.

Several of the students were excited to see their ancestor’s name, Robert Cockett (husband of Loke Kahikiwawe Cockett), carefully etched into a stone face below the historic windmill that had been built on the lower heiau in the early 1900s, as well. The group also visited to the ancient ki’i (petroglyphs) which the po’e kahiko etched into a stone surface on the side of the heiau. 

Much aloha to many volunteers and the Pūlama Lāna’i Culture & Historic Preservation crew for making the program a great experience for all.